TV personality Maria Menounos, who lost her mother to brain cancer, shares a touching message about her reunion with her father and the loss of her beloved dog

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Emotional message from Maria Menounos

  • TV host Maria Menounos, 43, told fans that her parents’ beloved dog died due to failing health. It was the first time she had visited her parents’ home since losing her mother to brain cancer in May.
  • A new treatment option called Optune could be a game-changer for those battling the most common glioblastoma in brain cancer.
  • Faced with a tragic loss, families said SurvivorNet that supporting each other has helped them turn sad times into precious memories.

Energetic TV personality Maria Menounos, 43, lost her mother to brain cancer in May and now shares with fans that she and her father lost their beloved dog. It is the first time that Menounos has returned home since the death of her mother.

Menounos took to Instagram on Thursday to share the news that her parents’ dog, Beethoven, has died due to health concerns. In the post, she shared a number of touching images of Beethoven and his parents over the years, and also revealed that it was the first time she had visited the house since losing her mother. brain cancer.

Related: “We Try To Make Everything Fun. Even Tumors”: TV Host Maria Menounos, 43, Emphasizes Power Of Positivity As A Cancer Caregiver

“I was already so sad to come home knowing it was the first time that I had not returned to my mother’s house and then seeing her beloved baby in such a rough state was just terrible,” wrote Menounos.

The past year has been filled with struggles for Menounos and his family as both parents tested positive for COVID-19 in April, then immediately learned that his mother’s tumor had progressed. The following month, her mother passed away. Despite all these hardships, Menounos and his father learn to live together as a family.

Advances in the treatment of brain cancer

Brain cancer treatment has come a long way in the past few decades, but there is still a lot of work to be done. However, there is an exciting development in the field that could be a game-changer for those battling brain cancer or tumors.

For glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer that is extremely aggressive and fast growing, there is an option for patients that can extend survival time – Optune. This treatment was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in October 2015 and is available for adults 22 years of age or older. This tumor treatment therapy comes in the form of a cap that attaches to a patient’s head, where electrical currents flow through adhesive pads. These currents disrupt the division of cancer cells, which can delay the progression of the disease and thus lengthen the survival time of some patients.

Related: TV Host Maria Menounos, 43, Says She ‘Starts To See So Mourning Stages’ After Losing Mother To Brain Cancer

The life expectancy of most glioblastomas is currently two years, but in clinical trials using Optune alongside standard treatment, researchers have found that the rate has increased. For half of the patients, two more years were added to their median survival, and one-third of the patients saw their survival rate increase by another five years.

“I just want to point out to patients that when I started doing this in 1999, there was maybe less than 5% of patients with this disease who had been alive for two years,” Dr. Suriya Jeyapalan, neuro oncologist at Tufts Medical Center, Raconté SurvivorNet in a previous interview. “Now we get to maybe a third of the patients alive to five years old. It’s not your father’s brain tumor, and I kind of want to send a message of hope to the patients. In the future, we will add to these treatments and make them even better.

Dr Suriya Jeyapalan explains how Optune has shown great promise in increasing survival rates of glioblastoma patients

Face the loss

Whether it’s a loved one or a loved one, coping with loss can be a difficult thing to do on your own. This is why for Menounos and his father, going through this experience together can be a useful way to unravel the roller coaster of emotions you are feeling. There are many ways to cope with grief, and families who have lost loved ones to cancer have said SurvivorNet that they were able to channel this sadness and use it as a way to create happier memories.

Related: Mother’s Day Special Edition: Mothers and Daughters Facing Cancer; Andrea Swift, Olivia Newton-John and Sharon Osbourne

This was the case with Camila Legaspi, who lost her mother to breast cancer while in high school. It wasn’t until she went to college and started exploring new passions that she learned that she could turn her sadness into something she ended up cherishing.

“I actually took that sadness and let it motivate me,” Camila said. SurvivorNet. “I’ve learned that it’s okay to be sad sometimes. It’s good to have sadness with you… it’s not always a bad thing. It makes you who you are, it gives you a story to tell, and it helps you teach others to deal with their sadness.

Camila Legaspi, who lost her mother to breast cancer, learned to create something beautiful out of sadness

Learn more about SurvivorNet’s rigorous medical review process.

Emotional message from Maria Menounos

  • TV host Maria Menounos, 43, told fans that her parents’ beloved dog died due to failing health. It was the first time she had visited her parents’ home since losing her mother to brain cancer in May.
  • A new treatment option called Optune could be a game-changer for those battling the most common glioblastoma in brain cancer.
  • Faced with a tragic loss, families said SurvivorNet that supporting each other has helped them turn sad times into precious memories.

Energetic TV personality Maria Menounos, 43, lost her mother to brain cancer in May and now shares with fans that she and her father lost their beloved dog. It is the first time that Menounos has returned home since the death of her mother.

Menounos took to Instagram on Thursday to share the news that her parents’ dog, Beethoven, has died due to health concerns. In the post, she shared a number of touching images of Beethoven and his parents over the years, and also revealed that it was the first time she had visited the house since losing her mother. brain cancer.

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Related: “We Try To Make Everything Fun. Even Tumors”: TV Host Maria Menounos, 43, Emphasizes Power Of Positivity As A Cancer Caregiver

“I was already so sad to come home knowing it was the first time that I had not returned to my mother’s house and then seeing her beloved baby in such a rough state was just terrible,” wrote Menounos.

The past year has been filled with struggles for Menounos and his family as both parents tested positive for COVID-19 in April, then immediately learned that his mother’s tumor had progressed. The following month, her mother passed away. Despite all these hardships, Menounos and his father learn to live together as a family.

Advances in the treatment of brain cancer

Brain cancer treatment has come a long way in the past few decades, but there is still a lot of work to be done. However, there is an exciting development in the field that could be a game-changer for those battling brain cancer or tumors.

For glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer that is extremely aggressive and fast growing, there is an option for patients that can extend survival time – Optune. This treatment was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in October 2015 and is available for adults 22 years of age or older. This tumor treatment therapy comes in the form of a cap that attaches to a patient’s head, where electrical currents flow through adhesive pads. These currents disrupt the division of cancer cells, which can delay the progression of the disease and thus lengthen the survival time of some patients.

Related: TV Host Maria Menounos, 43, Says She ‘Starts To See So Mourning Stages’ After Losing Mother To Brain Cancer

The life expectancy of most glioblastomas is currently two years, but in clinical trials using Optune alongside standard treatment, researchers have found that the rate has increased. For half of the patients, two more years were added to their median survival, and one-third of the patients saw their survival rate increase by another five years.

“I just want to point out to patients that when I started doing this in 1999, there was maybe less than 5% of patients with this disease who had been alive for two years,” Dr. Suriya Jeyapalan, neuro oncologist at Tufts Medical Center, Raconté SurvivorNet in a previous interview. “Now we get to maybe a third of the patients alive to five years old. It’s not your father’s brain tumor, and I kind of want to send a message of hope to the patients. In the future, we will add to these treatments and make them even better.

Dr Suriya Jeyapalan explains how Optune has shown great promise in increasing survival rates of glioblastoma patients

Face the loss

Whether it’s a loved one or a loved one, coping with loss can be a difficult thing to do on your own. This is why for Menounos and his father, going through this experience together can be a useful way to unravel the roller coaster of emotions you are feeling. There are many ways to cope with grief, and families who have lost loved ones to cancer have said SurvivorNet that they were able to channel this sadness and use it as a way to create happier memories.

Related: Special Edition Mother’s Day: Mothers and Daughters Facing Cancer; Andrea Swift, Olivia Newton-John and Sharon Osbourne

This was the case with Camila Legaspi, who lost her mother to breast cancer while in high school. It wasn’t until she went to college and started exploring new passions that she learned that she could turn her sadness into something she ended up cherishing.

“I actually took that sadness and let it motivate me,” Camila said. SurvivorNet. “I’ve learned that it’s okay to be sad sometimes. It’s good to have sadness with you… it’s not always a bad thing. It makes you who you are, it gives you a story to tell, and it helps you teach others to deal with their sadness.

Camila Legaspi, who lost her mother to breast cancer, learned to create something beautiful out of sadness

Learn more about SurvivorNet’s rigorous medical review process.



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